The most informative map of Oz... EVER


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This is the temp map from last week, showing the heatwave we have had.

heatwave-australia-january-2019.jpg.5e7ccad01c9d35cbe9f25fc11c96ad97.jpg

3 hours ago, cfc1016 said:

...unless someone can provide a map with delineation of emus/no emus zones ?

And because you asked for it....

image.png.00cc67101c1fca36483d3d6106252c0a.png

The presence record of emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) in January (summer) and July (winter) in Australia reported from the Atlas of Australian Birds (Barrett et al., 2003) superimposed on a MODIS MOD12Q1-UMD global land cover map [38] where the following vegetation classes each cover more than one percent of the total area: EBF (Evergreen Broadleaf Forest), OSH (Open Shrubland), WSA (Woody Savanna), SA (Savanna), GRA (Grassland), CRO (Cropland), and BAR (Barren).

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1 hour ago, Fuzz said:

This is the temp map from last week, showing the heatwave we have had.

heatwave-australia-january-2019.jpg.5e7ccad01c9d35cbe9f25fc11c96ad97.jpg

And because you asked for it....

image.png.00cc67101c1fca36483d3d6106252c0a.png

The presence record of emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) in January (summer) and July (winter) in Australia reported from the Atlas of Australian Birds (Barrett et al., 2003) superimposed on a MODIS MOD12Q1-UMD global land cover map [38] where the following vegetation classes each cover more than one percent of the total area: EBF (Evergreen Broadleaf Forest), OSH (Open Shrubland), WSA (Woody Savanna), SA (Savanna), GRA (Grassland), CRO (Cropland), and BAR (Barren).

I was thinking more along the lines of this gem from the Great Emu War.

Also what's up with those temps? I thought you guys used centigrade like the rest of the world. Those have gotta be Fahrenheit values though, right?!?! I'm kind of surprised that 117 is considered astronomically high there. I've seen as high as ~110F in DC, and over ~115 in florida. I would've thought that Oz would have significantly higher thresholds for 'extreme' heat than us. That's not to say that 117F isn't excruciatingly hot though.

un9491hoo66z.png

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39 minutes ago, MoeFOH said:

I'd like to see a detailed map of Tassie, but I'm guessing that contravenes forum rules. ?

Ask and ye shall receive...

Traditional detail map:

gmneflyl0muy.thumb.png.62b4847dcd63082585b7112252cc3b75.png

Dirt tracks, roads, highways:

oliaa1S.thumb.png.21a5916bbc28adaec52530bd61a6b724.png

Topo:

zAcNvAM.thumb.jpg.eb00de50e930060e5fea56ff5c311a5b.jpg

Light pollution:

YmDryE8.jpg.d54d1a143edfc3d7940ead9b42fa5a42.jpg

The one you were *probably* talking about...:

tnjZ7sT.jpg.5c250b6d6b056f796e4957ba0dfa8bc0.jpg

Just for fun:

xcbYN2M.jpg.080d36363ca974fedaa3a319243868a6.jpg

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16 minutes ago, cookj1 said:

When did Oz stop reporting temperatures in celcius?  Fahrenheit is such a foreign thing to me.  

We do use Celsius, and the metric system too, as we live in the modern world...  :P

358849840_Heatwave20190115.thumb.png.589ae68f20f2b82b021dd2e4311b5a40.png

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56 minutes ago, cfc1016 said:

I was thinking more along the lines of this gem from the Great Emu War.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.a95f85b847a1ff77b82752b898d495a2.jpeg

If you want a modern comparison, do you recall the scene from "SW: The Last Jedi", where Kylo Ren orders all the AT-M6 walkers to fire on Luke Skywalker? Just substitute the Australian Army for the walkers and a bunch of emus for Luke. The result was pretty much the same.

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It is often asked on the forum, "With all the things that can kill you in Australia, how do you Aussie cope?".

We like to think we handle things in a cool and calm manner, but after you guys read about the Great Emu War, the answer is... not very well.

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emus (although how the hell can it be so hard for everyone outside australia to pronounce a three letter word) are no real problem. 

it is the cassowaries you need to watch out for. north queensland. closest thing to a living feathered dinosaur imaginable. large sharp beak, grumpy temper, aggressive, persistent and worst of all, they have feet that are near identical to those from a velociraptor. if they decide they do not like you - and these are the third largest birds in the world yet are so well camoflaged that they can be three feet from you in the scrub and you do not see them - they just come at you and keep coming. slashing with the claws. probably more fatalities than from sharks. 

emus are just really dumb. really. 

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Birds

The Worst Way To Die In The Wild Is By Cassowary Attack

October 21, 2016
Written by Curiosity Staff
 
 
8,144

Nature is beautiful, and also pretty terrifying. Hurricanes, heat waves, tornadoes, lightning strikes, hail storms, earthquakes... we'll stop there. Many natural disasters have claimed lives, but which would be the most excruciating way to go? According to Outside magazine, it's not by drowning or ingesting poison—it's by the attack of a cassowary. What's a cassowary? We're glad you asked...

 
 
 
 

The cassowary is known as the most dangerous bird on Earth. The black and blue, ostrich-like animal stands at 6 feet tall and can chase you at speeds up to 31 mph. Cassowaries in the wild are known to be shy, but once they get the taste of people food, they'll pester and attack to get more. The bird has a powerful kick that could knock you out. But the scariest part about cassowaries is their 5-inch-long dagger-like talons on their middle toes. If you're ever in New Guinea or Australia, keep an eye out for these modern-day velociraptors. Watch the videos below to learn more about this nightmare bird.

 
 

This Cassowary Can Kill You

Stay away. Far away.

Meet The World's Deadliest Bird

We're not kidding.

The Most Terrifying Bird On The Planet

This is your last warning...

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1 hour ago, Ken Gargett said:

emus (although how the hell can it be so hard for everyone outside australia to pronounce a three letter word) are no real problem. 

it is the cassowaries you need to watch out for. north queensland. closest thing to a living feathered dinosaur imaginable. large sharp beak, grumpy temper, aggressive, persistent and worst of all, they have feet that are near identical to those from a velociraptor. if they decide they do not like you - and these are the third largest birds in the world yet are so well camoflaged that they can be three feet from you in the scrub and you do not see them - they just come at you and keep coming. slashing with the claws. probably more fatalities than from sharks. 

emus are just really dumb. really. 

But how do they taste?

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19 minutes ago, Fuzz said:

Cassowary feet

image.thumb.jpeg.ff07c6dc18d12f1589495706c72dd048.jpeg

Emu feet

image.jpeg.ddac753707f0becbc03a14bbfe345ef7.jpeg

Ostrich feet

1116900226_ostrichfeet.thumb.jpg.ec51dbb8224cff984bec0a568db2d0db.jpg

I would not want to be bludgeoned or lacerated by ANY of those. ALL birds are dinosaurs. Most are further removed from the frightening genetic traits of the therapods from which modern Aves descend. Those three... not so far removed. Bugger that. A big male ostrich once performed a mating damve at me. I don’t know what was more off-putting - the dance itself, or the thought of what he... wanted to do to me. Also not sure whether I’m more scared of being ‘mated’ or lacerated. Either sound like they would land me in a straight jacket for life after a prolonged real life re-enactment of the shower scene from ‘Crying Game’. It makes me want to vomit from my fingernails. 

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1 hour ago, Ken Gargett said:

emus (although how the hell can it be so hard for everyone outside australia to pronounce a three letter word) are no real problem. 

Ken,

You mean the "ee-moos" ?  :wacko:

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8 hours ago, Ken Gargett said:
Birds

The Worst Way To Die In The Wild Is By Cassowary Attack

October 21, 2016
Written by Curiosity Staff
 
 
8,144

Nature is beautiful, and also pretty terrifying. Hurricanes, heat waves, tornadoes, lightning strikes, hail storms, earthquakes... we'll stop there. Many natural disasters have claimed lives, but which would be the most excruciating way to go? According to Outside magazine, it's not by drowning or ingesting poison—it's by the attack of a cassowary. What's a cassowary? We're glad you asked...

 
 
 
 

The cassowary is known as the most dangerous bird on Earth. The black and blue, ostrich-like animal stands at 6 feet tall and can chase you at speeds up to 31 mph. Cassowaries in the wild are known to be shy, but once they get the taste of people food, they'll pester and attack to get more. The bird has a powerful kick that could knock you out. But the scariest part about cassowaries is their 5-inch-long dagger-like talons on their middle toes. If you're ever in New Guinea or Australia, keep an eye out for these modern-day velociraptors. Watch the videos below to learn more about this nightmare bird.

 
 

This Cassowary Can Kill You

Stay away. Far away.

Meet The World's Deadliest Bird

We're not kidding.

The Most Terrifying Bird On The Planet

This is your last warning...

My neighbor is an ornithologist, he was telling me about these guys and how they kill people. I was just like WTF, what doesn't kill you in Oz? 

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4 hours ago, HopeUgood said:

My neighbor is an ornithologist, he was telling me about these guys and how they kill people. I was just like WTF, what doesn't kill you in Oz? 

If it came down to defending yourself against an attack from an Australian Cassowary or a North American Grizzly Bear, I'd take the Cassowary any day of the week.  

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6 hours ago, Kitchen said:

If it came down to defending yourself against an attack from an Australian Cassowary or a North American Grizzly Bear, I'd take the Cassowary any day of the week.  

if we are putting up contenders, the poor old cassowary would not even make the pre-fight card. i doubt if 90% of australians even know they can be dangerous. they are so far off the 'animals to worry about' list it does not matter. 

not that i have the slightest desire to ever confront a grizzly, but grizzly v saltie? the saltie would take care of the grizzy before settling down to snack on both of us. and there are plenty more. 

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20 hours ago, Ken Gargett said:
Birds

The Worst Way To Die In The Wild Is By Cassowary Attack

October 21, 2016
Written by Curiosity Staff
 
 
8,144

Nature is beautiful, and also pretty terrifying. Hurricanes, heat waves, tornadoes, lightning strikes, hail storms, earthquakes... we'll stop there. Many natural disasters have claimed lives, but which would be the most excruciating way to go? According to Outside magazine, it's not by drowning or ingesting poison—it's by the attack of a cassowary. What's a cassowary? We're glad you asked...

 
 
 
 

The cassowary is known as the most dangerous bird on Earth. The black and blue, ostrich-like animal stands at 6 feet tall and can chase you at speeds up to 31 mph. Cassowaries in the wild are known to be shy, but once they get the taste of people food, they'll pester and attack to get more. The bird has a powerful kick that could knock you out. But the scariest part about cassowaries is their 5-inch-long dagger-like talons on their middle toes. If you're ever in New Guinea or Australia, keep an eye out for these modern-day velociraptors. Watch the videos below to learn more about this nightmare bird.

 
 

This Cassowary Can Kill You

Stay away. Far away.

Meet The World's Deadliest Bird

We're not kidding.

The Most Terrifying Bird On The Planet

This is your last warning...

     *According to the nice lady in the narration, these birds kill maybe one person a year. She told of a bloke killed by one but he was trying to kill IT. Elephants in India kill 300 people a year; our own Man's Best Friend in the States kill around 28 people a year...*

 

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1 hour ago, Ken Gargett said:

if we are putting up contenders, the poor old cassowary would not even make the pre-fight card. i doubt if 90% of australians even know they can be dangerous. they are so far off the 'animals to worry about' list it does not matter. 

not that i have the slightest desire to ever confront a grizzly, but grizzly v saltie? the saltie would take care of the grizzy before settling down to snack on both of us. and there are plenty more. 

Pitching animals of equal weight, in neutral territory (2' deep water, let's say - since grizzly bears are actually quite adept swimmers, but a land battle would be unfair to the croc), and in equally cranky, hungry moods - I give it to the griz. They're a lot tougher than you think. Their skin and coat are like a kevlar vest with tank armor on top of it; their claws are just as versatile weapon as their bite. Death roll or not, I think the griz would stand a good chance of getting at the croc's belly and disemboweling it. He'd probably also die, but only after limping away from leaving the croc dead at the scene.

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