Over glamorized cigar reviews


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The cigar industry is a delicate ecosystem that relies on a balance of quality, tradition, and reputation. Unfortunately, misinformation and overly-glamorized reviews can upset this balance and harm the industry as a whole.

Misinformation, whether it is intentional or not, can lead to confusion and mistrust for consumers.

Glamorized reviews, on the other hand, can create unrealistic expectations and lead to disappointment among consumers. When reviewers use overly-flowery language or exaggerate the qualities of a cigar, it can lead to unrealistic expectations that the cigar can never live up to. This can lead to disappointment and frustration among consumers, which can discourage them from buying cigars in the future.

Furthermore, both of these issues can lead to a lack of trust in the industry, which can make it difficult for legitimate manufacturers and retailers to do business.

To protect the cigar industry from the harmful effects of misinformation and overly-glamorized reviews, it is important for consumers to do their own research and read reviews from a variety of sources. Additionally, manufacturers and retailers should be transparent and honest about their products, and reviewers should strive to be objective and accurate in their descriptions.

 The cigar industry is a delicate ecosystem that relies on a balance of quality, tradition, and reputation. Misinformation and overly-glamorized reviews can upset this balance and harm the industry as a whole. By being informed, transparent and objective, we can help promote a healthy cigar industry and protect it from the harmful effects of misinformation and overly-glamorized reviews.

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Whose filter do we view "Over Glamorized" through?  Yours? AI? a starchamber of "over glamorized review" police?  People need to grow up and put on their "big boy" pants. When someone is sel

chatgpt strikes again?

To the topic: I'd rather embellished reviews over not. Put me in your shoes during the review experience. None of that harms the hobby--if anything it may draw more to it. The only harm I find is if i

15 minutes ago, KnightsAnole said:

I’m not going to point fingers at people, but if you’re not aware of this, you haven’t been around the cigar industry for very long.

I'm fully aware of this and I've been around this industry for almost 20 years now. Ive seen my share of questionable reviews on YouTube from so-called experts. I see nothing wrong posting an example of a review that you do not agree with. If people are unable to accept criticism then they should not post public reviews.

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4 minutes ago, dms99 said:

I'm fully aware of this and I've been around this industry for almost 20 years now. Ive seen my share of questionable reviews on YouTube from so-called experts. I see nothing wrong posting an example of a review that you do not agree with. If people are unable to accept criticism then they should not post public reviews.

I would agree, and I, like many, could produce examples all day. I think CA has  more than a few, most forums have their fair share as well. But I’m not going to point anyone out.

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If you're referring to those reviewers who use phrases like "I get anise notes", "the finish was dry and tannic", "hints of cedar evolved into dried mushroom", "the palate was awash in dried fruit tones" etc, etc. Sure. There is some embellishment.  Anyone who writes cigar reviews either as a pro, or hobbyist, has a palate and a personal frame of reference in which to convey what they are experiencing.  I dont think that will harm the industry.  I can see it being negative if the producer publishes those tasting notes, or "professional" reviewers lend their name and rating to a product.  It's the same with wine and spirits.  Producers shop for the best review and many reviewers end up becoming beholden to the process.  It's part of the marketing.  In that sense, that can be detrimental.  Anyone who buys on those published words needs to employ a bit more "caveat emptor". Don't drop your money on a box. Maybe sample a stick or two?  And some, let's face it, don't really taste much and think that those who do are making it up.  Every person's palate is different.  Yet, both parties seem to enjoy their cigars.  :)

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So you’ve never experienced disappointment after expecting something different from what you thought was a solid review? When I was first getting into cigars, I was struck how full of bs many reviews were. I quickly learned to only trust my own palate. I like reading Katman for those sorts of wandering reviews though, but that’s not really what I mean by overly glamorized. Wine is a great example too, even more so.

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Here’s an example of what I mean:

The exquisite flavor and aroma of the Diamond Crown Maximus cigars are truly unparalleled. Handcrafted with the finest aged tobaccos and expertly rolled by master artisans, these cigars exude luxury and class. The smooth, rich taste and perfect burn will transport you to a realm of pure indulgence. Whether you're celebrating a special occasion or simply looking to treat yourself, the Diamond Crown Maximus is the ultimate cigar experience.

However, in reality, the Diamond Crown Maximus cigars are not as "exquisite" as advertised. Many cigar enthusiasts have complained about uneven burns and subpar flavor. Additionally, the high price point is not justified by the quality of the cigar. While the branding and packaging may evoke a sense of luxury, the reality is that there are many other cigars on the market that offer better value for the price.

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4 minutes ago, KnightsAnole said:

Well, that’s partly true. But, I think you know what I mean without being more specific or pointing people out.

I mean specifically that the language provided is actual sales text. Not a review. If it is marauding as a review on a review site--then that review was paid for. 

Some of this comes down to people's ability to discern between sales copy and marketing vs actual unbiased reviews. Just like people have to do basic research about their sources of news. 

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Yea, your right about that. 

2 minutes ago, jakebarnes said:

I mean specifically that the language provided is actual sales text. Not a review. If it is marauding as a review on a review site--then that review was paid for. 

Some of this comes down to people's ability to discern between sales copy and marketing vs actual unbiased reviews. Just like people have to do basic research about their sources of news. 

Maybe this is more what I mean,

"The Diamond Crown Maximus is a cigar that is truly in a class of its own. The construction is impeccable, with a perfectly even burn that allows the flavors to develop fully. The draw is spot on, providing just the right amount of resistance. The flavor profile is complex, with notes of cedar, espresso, and a hint of sweetness on the finish.

The cigar is not just a treat for the palate, but also a visual delight. The dark, oily wrapper glistens in the light, hinting at the complexity within. The band is elegant, understated, and perfectly in keeping with the overall theme of luxury.

 

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The marketing jargon and the disparity between what’s written and what’s experienced from some sources is wild, both in reviews and sales descriptions I will agree on that point..

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19 minutes ago, 99call said:

I would much rather read a review of someone who was plugged into emotional state, thoughts, memories, etc etc, than a cigar reviewer who was either limited in there terms of reference, or somehow a bit emotionally repressed. 

I've been (like many) to distilleries, vinyeards etc etc for tasting, and you get a full gamut or reactions,  some will be verbose, flowery in their language, and maybe even a bit tenuous, and others will say "this tastes like wine!?" and always expect a big laugh.       I've noticed the latter is often connected to a certain degree of macho projection. 

I've read cigar reviews on FOH, that read something to the affect.    "Good cigar,   good tobacco taste.......the end".  Personally I find that as useful as a chocolate teapot. 

There is also the more dangerous output of paid up shills,  which I do find annoying, and should be pointed out wherever we find them.  As their output is obviously worthless

If i'm going to buy a box of cigars, I want to read as many reviews as I can, and work out a mean impression, a broad sort of truism. 

There is a fair point here as well..

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15 minutes ago, KnightsAnole said:

Yea, your right about that. 

Maybe this is more what I mean,

"The Diamond Crown Maximus is a cigar that is truly in a class of its own. The construction is impeccable, with a perfectly even burn that allows the flavors to develop fully. The draw is spot on, providing just the right amount of resistance. The flavor profile is complex, with notes of cedar, espresso, and a hint of sweetness on the finish.

The cigar is not just a treat for the palate, but also a visual delight. The dark, oily wrapper glistens in the light, hinting at the complexity within. The band is elegant, understated, and perfectly in keeping with the overall theme of luxury.

 

This reads like marketing fluff. If it is not part of the cigars' ad, but a review. That review is dubious at best.

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I like this thread.

When i started smoking cigars a bit more than ten years ago, i bought my first boxes based on forum users reviews and not on manufacturers descriptions. Unfortunately it has been a big disappointment every time.

I don't read cigar reviews very often now and when i do i find it amusing at best. This whole thing of cigar reviews is so subjective and depends on so many factors that the chances that i feel/sense/taste the same thing as the people writing the review are slim to none. I'd rather take my chances and buy the cigar and taste it myself.

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How it works for me, on FOH at least, is this:

Spot trends for how others taste/describe certain flavours and how these compare to my own observations on the same stick. However embellished or otherwise their language might be, there are certain members who when they give a description, it means something to me. Sometimes this is a direct correlation to my own opinion, sometimes there's a bit of unconscious de-coding based on previous experiences of that member's descriptions vs my own. But it's useful, even if the language itself appears hyperbolic in isolation. As others have said, it is more useful than unspecific or vague language.

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6 minutes ago, david9985 said:

How it works for me, on FOH at least, is this:

Spot trends for how others taste/describe certain flavours and how these compare to my own observations on the same stick. However embellished or otherwise their language might be, there are certain members who when they give a description, it means something to me. Sometimes this is a direct correlation to my own opinion, sometimes there's a bit of unconscious de-coding based on previous experiences of that member's descriptions vs my own. But it's useful, even if the language itself appears hyperbolic in isolation. As others have said, it is more useful than unspecific or vague language.

I think your doing it the right way. I’d be cautious of the echo chamber though.

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2 hours ago, jakebarnes said:

That's marketing fluff, not a review. 

My thoughts exactly, nothing to do with someone actually smoking a Diamond Crown Maximus and writing down their thoughts on the experience.

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