Report from Cuba after 60 years of socialism .


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2 minutes ago, BirdDog said:

Embargo

 

I think the text book definition of a blockade implies that something (trade) is being physically blocked. Ex: the naval blockade prevented ships from leaving or entering the harbor. 

Thanks. I thought embargo was used just in spanish.

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1 hour ago, oliverdst said:

What would be the correct word? 

One definition of Blockade from the Cambridge English dictionary:

"the act of using force or the threat of force to stop the movement of people or goods into or out of a country or area, or the people or objects used to prevent such movement:

The blockade consisted of a dozen ships surrounding the port."

Maybe Financial Embargo or Tariffs? Window dressing would probably be the most accurate though. The "Embargo" serves 2 purposes today.

1 . Feeding the US' ego/hubris. "We are standing up to tyrants!!" Blah Blah Blah We tip over our selves to conduct as much business as we can with far worse regimes and human beings. We don't mind if you kill one of our citizens in an another country's embassy, but if you stole a beach house from my great grand father 60 years ago, there is no punishment great enough. I guess.

2. Providing cover for the Guy running the show in Cuba. Without it, there are zero excuses left for why nothing works and everything is falling apart. Weather its true or not (it isn't) if you hear it enough, your bound to start believing it. "Due to the Embargo with the United States" is the excuse you get for everything. Why does Cuba have to import Sugar? Why does Cuban QC suck? Why cant one of the most fertile islands on the planet produce enough food for their tiny population?   

The US doesn't stop or hinder the movement of people (You and I met there in November right?) Nor do they limit the movement of goods, Cuba imports more chicken from the US than anywhere else on earth. Over $1 billion dollars worth since 2000. They have Coca Cola, I Phones and Nikes there too, right? It seems like things are moving to me. 

The financial restrictions do undeniably make things more difficult to find and expensive to source. They need to be completely removed. But they are not the reason Cuba started collapsing in 1959. With Venezuela deteriorating more each day it will be interesting to see what happens. They are just about out of country's left to prop them up. 

https://www.nola.com/business/index.ssf/2016/03/chicken_producers_cuba_excited.html

 

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9 hours ago, oliverdst said:

Thanks. I thought embargo was used just in spanish.

The most used Spanish word in Cuba for it is : El Bloqueo.
Embargo is hardly used in Cuba, it is always : El Bloqueo ....

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I stopped overlooking the article at this "Insight" ... what a BS :

 

Are they tuned into politics? Where do they get their information?

Cubans pay very close attention to politics. They get their information through television, radio, print news, social media, and from the world around them.

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32 minutes ago, nino said:

The most used Spanish word in Cuba for it is : El Bloqueo.
Embargo is hardly used in Cuba, it is always : El Bloqueo ....

So then 'blockade' would be a correct translation for the common parlance in Cuba, then, if that is the case.

Not offering any opinion on the article - just the use of the word blockade.

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2 hours ago, cfc1016 said:

So then 'blockade' would be a correct translation for the common parlance in Cuba, then, if that is the case.

Not offering any opinion on the article - just the use of the word blockade.

It's a correct translation but not the correct term.

There's a country that calls itself the Democratic People's Republic of North Korea. Translate it how much you want - it remains wrong labelling.

I mentioned it in my post above - the linked article is issued by an organ, or at least a supporting body, of the Communist Party USA. That explains a particular bias. Still, interesting to get their views there.....

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4 hours ago, cfc1016 said:

So then 'blockade' would be a correct translation for the common parlance in Cuba, then, if that is the case.

Not offering any opinion on the article - just the use of the word blockade.

Yes, Cuban official media ( and party followers ) use it as : Bloqueo economico, bloqueo politico etc. when referring to the US trade measures against Cuba.

If you read the relevant article on Wikipedia in Spanish you will notice that "Embargo" is used only once in the title - all other references are to "El Bloqueo" ....

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embargo_estadounidense_a_Cuba

2 hours ago, Fugu said:

It's a correct translation but not the correct term.

.

Exactly - as Cuba is able to trade with any country ( and does so with the US on foodstuff imports etc ).

The correct term would be : Lack of Cash and long overdue & unpaid debts by the Cuban gvt. that scare investors ( and trade ) away from the island ...

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Regarding the lack of cash and the long overdue and unpaid debts by Cuba - some very recent information :

https://thecubaneconomy.com/articles/2019/01/reality-bites-cuba-plans-more-austerity-as-finances-worsen/

‘REALITY’ BITES: CUBA PLANS MORE AUSTERITY AS FINANCES WORSEN

HAVANA (Reuters) DECEMBER 28, 2018 / 3:14 PM

Cash-strapped Cuba plans fresh austerity measures and will pressure the sluggish bureaucracy to tighten its belt and cut red tape to address weak growth, falling export earnings and rising debt.

The economy has averaged 1 percent annual growth over the last three years, compared with a 5 percent to 7 percent rate economists say is needed to recover fully from a 1990s depression caused by the fall of its former benefactor, the Soviet Union.

The communist-run country has more recently been hit by the economic collapse of its new sponsor and strategic ally, Venezuela, which began to send fuel and cash its way in exchange for doctors and medicine 18 years ago.

Other external shocks, such as Hurricane Irma in late 2017 and the Trump administration’s tightening of U.S. sanctions, have also weighed on the Caribbean island nation’s economy.

“The 2019 plan is one of adjustment to current realities. We cannot spend more than we earn,” Economy Minister Alejandro Gil Fernandez said at a session of the National Assembly last week. State-run companies account for and control most economic activity, including finances and foreign trade, through a planned economy.

Cuba last reported its foreign debt at $15.8 billion in 2015. It began delaying payments to some suppliers and investors in 2016, with western diplomats and businessmen estimating the short-term debt accumulated since then at more than $1.5 billion.

Foreign trade fell around 25 percent from 2013 through 2017, with annual imports dropping to $11.3 billion from $15.6 billion, according to the government. Gil said trade declined further in 2018, without providing figures. The minister said exports would increase 6 percent next year while imports would be slashed 11 percent compared with the

Western diplomats who met with top officials recently said the Cubans said little about how they planned to surmount the crisis and gave no indication they would allow more private initiative and capital accumulation by citizens.

“Obtaining inputs and credit on the international market will be more difficult in 2019,” Vidal said.

 

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