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Depending if I'm making a dry or wet rub each has its own process

For my dry ribs I start by boiling my ribs in a beer bath I tend to use porters( they work better, IE Deschutes black butte is a great one to start with) or a stout in a pinch. After they have boiled and changed color I dry them off and use whatever rub I have but it's also great to make your own and keep it simple (salt, pepper, chili powder, garlic and onion powder). Once seasoned I let them cook at around 250° watch your smoke it will tell you how your ribs are doing half way I take them off and use a mixture of mustard and brown sugar to put on them and finish cooking. 

 

Now the wet ones which are the favorite at family get together plus my 18 month old son's favorite as well. 

I do the same process as I would dry without boiling them first boiling makes them too tender. 

I use the rub and then I wrap these in foil with a layer of apple juice on the bottom of the foil. (Also get a extra empty spray bottle). Halfway through these ribs I take them out of the foil and continously spritz the ribs with apple juice (been wanting to try peach juice). And then once the ribs are getting done a sauce of your choice to coat the ribs but watch it it will burn! These ribs I generally do really low 200° it's a timely process but it will all be worth it! 

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14 hours ago, HumidorJuan said:

. nice fresh pieces of Apple, or Cherry wood. (I do peach and pear woods with fish)

go with your favourite or whats accessible. And for me I don't soak my chunks (oh ya wood chips are silly, get a big chunk of something

Sound advice! I always find apple is perfect for ribs. Definitely chunks or whole logs. Never used pear, though it is available around me.  Sounds perfect for fish or chicken or lighter tasting cuts of pork.

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3 minutes ago, Stump89 said:

Sound advice! I always find apple is perfect for ribs. Definitely chunks or whole logs. Never used pear, though it is available around me.  Sounds perfect for fish or chicken or lighter tasting cuts of pork.

Ya it’s great for fish! Too bad I always over smoke the fish:(

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This was my cook today for the 4th. 3 bone plate beef ribs. Rub is super secret. 50/50 salt and pepper. Smoked (9 hours) at 275 F on oak (I'm from Texas). You know it's done when you can push a toothpick through it and it has the consistency of room temperature butter.

Simple but when cooked properly it cant be beat. That bark on there is key. The sun is always shining in the heart of flavor country. Had a boli BF afterwards to help recover from my meat coma

 

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