Are all cedars usable for cigars?


jdizzle113
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Hello all,

I recently bought myself a small wine fridge to store my desktop humidors in when we have heatwaves (for about a week a couple of weeks ago everyday was over 40C or 104F). Since then, I decided to keep my humidors in the fridge on a permanent basis so that I can maintain a constant temp of about 16C or 60.8F. Anyway, kept noticing it was really humid in the fridge (I made reference to this problem in another post) and I found out that because it is a specialist wine fridge it is designed to keep the interior humid (dry conditions dry cork out allowing oxidation of wine). Basically they designed it so that the condenser runs next to the compressor - so it uses the heat of the compressor to evaporate the condensed water and humidify the air - and by humidify I mean it fluctuates from 55% to 95% RH. Obviously this is not ideal for cigar storage - and I was quite annoyed as wine fridges are somewhat more expensive than regular fridges (which would not have this problem) - so I paid a premium and what I got was this problem.

But I've digressed a little from my topic. If somehow I manage to get the humidity inside the fridge to a stable 65% (I plan on trying with about a kilo of 65% RH beads and a cigar oasis XL) I wouldn't mind turning the fridge itself into a humidor. I know some people do this and then they panel most of the interior of their fridge with cedar - I don't really have the skill to do this . What I was planning on doing was chucking a few "cedar blocks" in there. It obviously wouldn't have as great an effect -but I reason that it should at least make the inside smell nicer and hopefully act as a buffer for humidity.

I've found these products (thanks to Ginseng - they are made by the same people who make the damp-rid you recommended) called "Cedar Fresh":

http://www.kendler.com.au/html/cedarfresh.html

They seem ideal. Although I looked on the packet and the type of cedar is called "Eastern Red Cedar" - I know that the inside of humidors is usually spanish cedar - so I was wondering if this "Eastern Red Cedar" is an acceptable alternative?

Cheers

James

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In short...GOD, NO!!!

But seriously, aromatic cedar (i.e., for cedar chests and moth control) must never be used with cigars as the overpowering scent can ruin to tobacco for smoking. Spanish cedar is preferred for its particular character but luan or luan plywood will serve. We have a resident humidor craftsman and perhaps he can answer your question more fully.

Wilkey

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Hi James, an extract from my website:

Humidors

The ideal construction material or lining for humidors is Spanish Cedar (Cedrela odorata). Spanish Cedar is not from Spain but from Brazil and other South American Countries, and is also called South American Cedar or sometimes Cigar Box Cedar. Other timbers used are American (or Canadian) red cedar (Thuja plicata) or Honduran mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla).

Spanish Cedar has a high absorption capacity (while remaining stable at high moisture levels), and is generally credited with a positive effect on the cigar aging process and in adding flavour to the cigars. Some have argued that its aromatic fragrance helps suppress tobacco beetle, but there is little evidence to support this.

Hope this helps.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I'm not an expert on this...but you mention that your wine fridge has a compressor. I think that's just like putting your cigars in a fridge...which will suck the humidity out of the cigars in a snap. A thermo electric type wine cooler is what you need if you don't have it.

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  • 6 months later...
I'm not an expert on this...but you mention that your wine fridge has a compressor. I think that's just like putting your cigars in a fridge...which will suck the humidity out of the cigars in a snap. A thermo electric type wine cooler is what you need if you don't have it.

x2 Thermoelectric is the way to go. They are used for storing wine because they keep the corks humidified properly. Hence why theyre perfect for cigars.

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In short...GOD, NO!!!

Wilkey

Always trust Wilkey. Always.

Putting a humidor into a fridge because it's hot is not a good idea. If it's a termoelectric unit you could hit dewpoint in the box. If it's a compressor it'll dry out everything. Irrespective, it's not good for the box or cigars to "shock" them with rapid temperature changes.

The best thing you can do for yourself is follow the KISS principle. Keep the desktop on the desktop out of direct sunlight.

If you're going to go with a controlled environment humidor then do some research. There's plenty of info on the web, a lot of it here.

All the best.

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Interesting discussion. I'm from Melbourne and a little concerned about heat this summer and my desktop humi. I don't have the time or money to convert a wine cooler into a humi at the moment.

Would it work to put a desktop humi inside an eski (cooler) on really hot days? Not ideal, but thinking it might help keep the temp down a little... Could be a good temporary solution?

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Do a search under "my new setup". I have a compressor based wine fridge and it is an ideal setup for me. Take a look and PM me with any questions. The key is having lots and lots of Spanish cedar in there (which I have in the form of cabs of cigars) and lots and lots of beads. My temp and humidity is very consistent.

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  • 2 months later...
I know I'm waaaay late to the party, but I've read that tobacco beetles don't like the taste of Spanish Cedar. As a result those little guys won't burrow in and make a home in your humi.

Tobacco beetles feed on tobacco (our cigars) - eggs are laid in tobacco, and when beetles hatch, they eat their way out of our cigars.

Container material is fairly irrelevant.

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Tobacco beetles feed on tobacco (our cigars) - eggs are laid in tobacco, and when beetles hatch, they eat their way out of our cigars.

Container material is fairly irrelevant.

I suppose to a certain extent, but there's nothing wrong with mitigating the damage from them hopping from one box to another.

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I suppose to a certain extent, but there's nothing wrong with mitigating the damage from them hopping from one box to another.

That's kind of the point - they will travel from cigar to cigar, from box of cigars to box of cigars - regardless of whether the cigars and boxes

are in a humidor lined with spanish cedar or a plastic cooler.

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