Thanksgiving Wine


anacostiakat
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am undecided and would like to hear what others are considering. I am interested in reds only.

I am looking for something special that I might actually be able to get (and afford). :jester::stir:

Roederer Estate Brut NV with appetizers

Pinot Noir (Dom. Drouhin Oregon Pinot Noir 2006) with turkey and stuffing

Banyuls with chocolate dessert

Taylor Fladgate 40 Year Old Tawney Port with the cigars after ---HEAVEN!

. . .all available at Calvert Woodley in DC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am going fairly low budge this year (under 30 bucks) Sticking with a new favorite---Rosenblum Rousanne, lightly sweet white that I love, and a couple of Rosenblum Zin, Snow Like zinfandel and Contra Coast Zinfandel. Local port (Harmony Cellars) for dessert.

Can't wait! No inlaws this year, just outlaws. :jester:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am going fairly low budge this year (under 30 bucks) Sticking with a new favorite---Rosenblum Rousanne, lightly sweet white that I love, and a couple of Rosenblum Zin, Snow Like zinfandel and Contra Coast Zinfandel. Local port (Harmony Cellars) for dessert.

Can't wait! No inlaws this year, just outlaws. :jester:

Although we had a Thanksgiving more than a month ago we had a nice Argentinian wine. Kaiken Ultra malbec which is about $25 up here or it's slight cheaper brother Malbec Reserve running at about $15.

Enjoy your Thanksgiving

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With turkey, we are having a Roche Pinot Noir for the red wine folks and a Kim Crawford Sauvignon Blanc for those who want a white. Check with your local wine store for a nice French Burgundy would be my advice. Oregon and California also make nice Pinot Noirs, but they vary a lot year to year as the Pinot Noir grape is difficult to grow and make into wine. I like my wines with a big fruity taste, so Oregon and California Pinots work for me. I find the French burgundy to be a little more subtle or mellow, but rich in character.

I will be having a Taylor Fladgate 20 year tawney port with my cigar once the family leaves. :jester:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For a "special" bottle(s) I'm undecided but am leaning toward:

1995 Chateau Leoville Poyferre

1996 Clos du Marquis

Hess Collection Mountain Cuvee (you should be able to find this one)

Regulars will probably include:

Campo Viejo Gran Reserva (I like the Crianza as well)

Sorelli Scuola Toscana

Stephen Vincent Crimson

E Guigal Cotes du Rhone

Probably a few others (note to self - I think I have a bottle of Fattoria le Terrazze Sassi Neri kicking around)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With turkey, we are having a Roche Pinot Noir for the red wine folks and a Kim Crawford Sauvignon Blanc for those who want a white. Check with your local wine store for a nice French Burgundy would be my advice. Oregon and California also make nice Pinot Noirs, but they vary a lot year to year as the Pinot Noir grape is difficult to grow and make into wine. I like my wines with a big fruity taste, so Oregon and California Pinots work for me. I find the French burgundy to be a little more subtle or mellow, but rich in character.

I will be having a Taylor Fladgate 20 year tawney port with my cigar once the family leaves. :D

Good to meet you in person the other day Tom!

I have a partial bottle of the Taylor. I think I'll pick up another. I know a lot of people recommend Pinot Noir but I am not sure. I seem to have bad luck with Pinot's that are spicy.

Maybe a mourvedre. . .if I can find one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to meet you in person the other day Tom!

I have a partial bottle of the Taylor. I think I'll pick up another. I know a lot of people recommend Pinot Noir but I am not sure. I seem to have bad luck with Pinot's that are spicy.

Maybe a mourvedre. . .if I can find one.

It was nice to meet you too Jim and I'll be at Drapers today around lunch. My wife and I really enjoy Pinots, but we haven't had much luck with any of our friends liking them, at least the big fruity ones. The French style seem to be more acceptable to most people, but I really like the ones from Sonoma and Russian River Valley. The Pinots from Oregon were the ones that got us hooked, so I need to find some place having a tasting on Pinots as I only have a few left in the basement. I'm not sure how a Syrah would work with turkey, but I'll probably open a bottle with the turkey as well. This thread got we checking the cellar for what I had left and I'm down to my last 2 Pinots.;
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was nice to meet you too Jim and I'll be at Drapers today around lunch. My wife and I really enjoy Pinots, but we haven't had much luck with any of our friends liking them, at least the big fruity ones. The French style seem to be more acceptable to most people, but I really like the ones from Sonoma and Russian River Valley. The Pinots from Oregon were the ones that got us hooked, so I need to find some place having a tasting on Pinots as I only have a few left in the basement. I'm not sure how a Syrah would work with turkey, but I'll probably open a bottle with the turkey as well. This thread got we checking the cellar for what I had left and I'm down to my last 2 Pinots.;

Got an eleven o'clock meeting so not sure when I'll try to get up there.

Well, I'll be looking for something (as we discussed) with body that doesnt break the bank. I just dont care for the spice and oakiness of some of the Russian River Valley stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Got an eleven o'clock meeting so not sure when I'll try to get up there.

Well, I'll be looking for something (as we discussed) with body that doesnt break the bank. I just dont care for the spice and oakiness of some of the Russian River Valley stuff.

I think I am gonna get some mourvedre. I understand there is a Cline Ancient Vine that is a good buy. I'll see what they have...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a Burgundy ****. When I am pairing a wine to a meal, seems to me Burgundy (and many west coast Pinots) match to most meals. Pizza? Fish? Steak? Salad? Works with them all.

Still even given my proclivities towards Burgundy and local Pinot, I think it is a particularly well suited all-around choice to pair with what ends up on most Thanksgiving tables. These are not the cheapest wines, and some can be the most expensive, but there are plenty under the $50 range which are excellent.

Also Colt mentioned Guigal Cotes du Rhone. It is another fine choice which reminded me of my old favorite price performer. In good years, Guigal Hermitage is an excellent inexpensive bottle of wine.

I hope everyone has an excellent Thanksgiving.

Cheers,

DC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

Community Software by Invision Power Services, Inc.