Boveda 320g recharge


FatPete
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  • 1 month later...

Sorry to bump up his thread but before opening a new one or asking in the chat.... what method would you recommend to recharge your 320g pack?

I have 2 in my cigar cooler and can't necessarily remove them to be recharged but I've noticed that they are shrinking now. Any recommendations?

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13 minutes ago, Jequan_sparxxx said:

Sorry to bump up his thread but before opening a new one or asking in the chat.... what method would you recommend to recharge your 320g pack?

I have 2 in my cigar cooler and can't necessarily remove them to be recharged but I've noticed that they are shrinking now. Any recommendations?

If you have a new one I suggest replacing one of your old packs with it so you are able to recharge without fear of throwing off your RH. Repeat the process until your pouches are completely recharged.

Get yourself a clean plastic container and put a smaller plastic container with distilled water in the bottom. Place a rack over the small container with your boveda on top. Seal the container and within a week or so your boveda will be ready to go.

Or you can just put a coffe cup with distilled water in a zip top bag with your boveda inside. This will take longer but will also work.

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The paper towel method works as well. I use it for recharging beads. I just don't like getting bovedas wet especially if I'm using one of those cardboard holders the 230g packs come in. It may just be paranoia on my part.

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  • 1 month later...

I watched a video that showed putting boveda packs of any size directly in a bowl of distilled water for a few days. I tried it and worked ok. Wore down appearance of the pack slightly. Does anyone think allowing the boveda to directly touch the water is an issue?

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I watched a video that showed putting boveda packs of any size directly in a bowl of distilled water for a few days. I tried it and worked ok. Wore down appearance of the pack slightly. Does anyone think allowing the boveda to directly touch the water is an issue?


Perhaps only for the structural longevity of the pack.


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On 3/4/2020 at 6:23 AM, Kayslay said:

I watched a video that showed putting boveda packs of any size directly in a bowl of distilled water for a few days. I tried it and worked ok. Wore down appearance of the pack slightly. Does anyone think allowing the boveda to directly touch the water is an issue?

I ve tried a few times this method and what I came about to realise is that the humidity shown on the pack wasn't accurate anymore. I only use passive rehumidification now. 

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On 1/25/2020 at 7:17 AM, Jequan_sparxxx said:

Ahhh, I got you! Thank you. 

I'm accustomed to wrapping my 8g with paper towel damped with distilled water for a few days so wasn't sure how to do it with the 320g.

So, so sounds like I'd need to buy a new one and repeat the process to keep them ready.

Thanks again @Burningman

I do it exactly as you noted. Damp papertowel wrapped around packs in a ziploc bag. If I get sun in a window and put them in that, they seemed to absorb faster. Repeat 2-3 times and they are golden. Personally, I've seen people do the submerge packs in water thing and I'm not a fan. Paper ends up warped, leaks are more susceptible, and it just seems messier and unnecessary to me. 

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20 hours ago, Lunettesman said:

I ve tried a few times this method and what I came about to realise is that the humidity shown on the pack wasn't accurate anymore. I only use passive rehumidification now. 

I noticed the same as I tried it. But, it seemed to go from 69% (those were my non Cuban packs) to around 71/72% interestingly enough. I also noticed some other liquid mixed in the water which I assume was from inside the packs.

Overall, the small ones recovered nicely from being submerged in the water after some air drying. While its easier than the paper towel method and the packs get far more puffy as well as have their rocks melted, paper towel still seems safer but Im not sure.  

For the 320g, I just ended up putting a container with distilled water into my Cigar Cooler and hoped the Boveda packs would absorb the excesses humidity. It's been a few weeks now and the container is about dry while humidity remained at 65%/66% so it seems to have worked but it likely was shared amongst all the packs in there. I will try the dumpling steamer method next.

 

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4 hours ago, Jequan_sparxxx said:

I noticed the same as I tried it. But, it seemed to go from 69% (those were my non Cuban packs) to around 71/72% interestingly enough. I also noticed some other liquid mixed in the water which I assume was from inside the packs.

Overall, the small ones recovered nicely from being submerged in the water after some air drying. While its easier than the paper towel method and the packs get far more puffy as well as have their rocks melted, paper towel still seems safer but Im not sure.  

For the 320g, I just ended up putting a container with distilled water into my Cigar Cooler and hoped the Boveda packs would absorb the excesses humidity. It's been a few weeks now and the container is about dry while humidity remained at 65%/66% so it seems to have worked but it likely was shared amongst all the packs in there. I will try the dumpling steamer method next.

 

Mine were 69% and changed to around 80%. I would highly suggest everyone to rehumidifie them slowly with a passive method. 

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