Smoking cigars during the fasting month of Ramadhan


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One of the common questions that i receive from friends and readers during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadhan is, “Can you smoke while you’re fasting?” — the simple answer to that is no.

The long answer is a bit more complicated. During the fasting month, Muslims are to refrain (during daylight hours at least) from all wide range of activities. Refraining from food and drink is just a small portion of the fast. Besides not smoking, it’s a also a time to refrain from sexual activity, cursing and swearing, and, even work, as practiced in some places. The idea is that the fasting month is a time of prayer, reflection and holy deeds only. It is the one time of the year where Muslims are to focus on their spiritual well being first above all others, and the way to be able to do this is to remove all temptations and distractions, including food, drink, and other bodily pleasures such as a great Havana cigar.

It really isn’t as restrictive as it sounds, and besides the spiritual benefits, it’s a good opportunity to detox as well. As we all know, cigars aren’t addictive in the sense of the word cigarettes or alcohol is addictive, so keeping my hands off the cigars for a month isn’t really very difficult to do. I think of it, as “more time for my beauties to age and rest”. Occasionally, i pick out a small stick to smoke after the breaking of the fast, but it really isn’t the same. I think not eating or drinking the whole day changes how our taste buds work somehow, and a cigar doesn’t quite taste the same. Thus defeating the purpose of smoking, thus i rather not waste my cigars for an imperfect experience.

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Thanks very much for the information, Aizuddin. It seems wise. I can't imagine a cigar being particularly appropriate in the midst of a fast, especially if the goal is to turn inward spiritually. A cigar, after all, has a way of making us focus on the experience, itself, thus largely defeating introspection.

A quesiton, if you please: what is the calculation whereby Ramadan occurs so relatively early this year?

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I'm not sure about the no smoking or eating bit, but the no working bit sounds up my alley! :-p

Good point about the smoke tasting different after not eating during the day, a cigar is almost always more satisfying after a rich meal.

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Thanks very much for the information, Aizuddin. It seems wise. I can't imagine a cigar being particularly appropriate in the midst of a fast, especially if the goal is to turn inward spiritually. A cigar, after all, has a way of making us focus on the experience, itself, thus largely defeating introspection.

A quesiton, if you please: what is the calculation whereby Ramadan occurs so relatively early this year?

Goes according to the lunar calendar, and since the lunar year and the normal calendar year are not synched, the result is that the lunar month of Ramadhan keeps on happening earlier in the year (well until it passes December again, then it'll be "later" in the year).

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The Jewish calendar is also lunar, thus our holidays also vary each year. One would not smoke during the Day of Attonement either. Many similarities in Muslim & Jewish tradition. I never understood why there is such friction between us. Both followers of Abraham/Ibraham.

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Goes according to the lunar calendar, and since the lunar year and the normal calendar year are not synched, the result is that the lunar month of Ramadhan keeps on happening earlier in the year (well until it passes December again, then it'll be "later" in the year).

Thanks for the clarification. I suspected that to be the case, but prefer actual authority to my own assumptions.

Blessings upon you and those you love during this time of reflection.

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Goes according to the lunar calendar, and since the lunar year and the normal calendar year are not synched, the result is that the lunar month of Ramadhan keeps on happening earlier in the year (well until it passes December again, then it'll be "later" in the year).

If you please, and it's not improper, if a person wanted to follow a day's ritual for the fast, how would it go? Is it a matter of not eating between sunrise and sunset? When does one pray, and what does one pray? Should one take time for readings from Holy Qu'ran?

What, then, is a "typical" day during Ramadan?

I ask because I've given a thought toward taking a couple of days and fasting according to the teachings of the Prophet (PBUH). I've followed other faith traditions, as well, but have never done this.

Any input you might kindly afford would be appreciated.

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I'm not sure about the no smoking or eating bit, but the no working bit sounds up my alley! :-p

Good point about the smoke tasting different after not eating during the day, a cigar is almost always more satisfying after a rich meal.

Just to clarify Dicko, u r suppose to do what u normally do non-fasting month, it's business as usual.

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I'm not sure about the no smoking or eating bit, but the no working bit sounds up my alley! :-p

Good point about the smoke tasting different after not eating during the day, a cigar is almost always more satisfying after a rich meal.

Just to clarify Dicko, u r suppose to do what u normally do non-fasting month, it's business as usual.

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If you please, and it's not improper, if a person wanted to follow a day's ritual for the fast, how would it go? Is it a matter of not eating between sunrise and sunset? When does one pray, and what does one pray? Should one take time for readings from Holy Qu'ran?

What, then, is a "typical" day during Ramadan?

I ask because I've given a thought toward taking a couple of days and fasting according to the teachings of the Prophet (PBUH). I've followed other faith traditions, as well, but have never done this.

Any input you might kindly afford would be appreciated.

If i may share my experience, but i would like to put a caveat though, I'm not an extremely religous person. Fasting is from sun up to sun down and its not limited to just food its inclusive of drinks. No orifice of your body can be penetrated ie no nose or ear picking. Well let me just run through typical day of fasting with the local time (Bob if you want to apply it, you have to check the local timings)

Before Imsak 5.30 am - This is the last meal you will have before the day of fasting. Of what i observed people will read the quran this time while waiting for the morning prayers.

Subuh 5.35 am - The morning prayers (sun up)

Business as usual

Zohor 1.30pm - The afternoon prayers

Business as usual

Asar 4.30 pm - The evening prayers

Maghrib 7.30 pm - Breaking fast followed by late evening prayers (sun down)

Isyak 8.30 pm - Night Prayers followed by Terawih prayers. And some people do read quran after the terawih

This is in nutshell of what you go through a day. Bob, if you want to try it, its difficult the 1st 2 days, after that it's quite breezy. You don't realize how time flies.

I would like wish everybody Ramadhan Mubarak.

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